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What's the average life of a CPAP machine; Frequency of machine replacement
Topic Started: Sep 22 2011, 10:43 PM (7,411 Views)
bobg1946
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Over 17 years that I've slept with a CPAP, I've had 5 machines. The first one, a Respironics upright with hidden dials, lasted about four years until it started making a whistling sound that kept both me and my wife awake. The second one, a ResMed, I think lasted a couple of years, until I drowned it one night when the humidifier slipped off it's stand and dumped the water into the machine. I don't really remember what the third one was; the DME supplier provided it as a replacement for the 'wet' one. The fourth one is my current home machine, a Fisher & Paykel H200 series that I've had for the last several years. My fifth one, the AEOMed Everest 3, I purchased outright three years ago because I got tired of lugging the F&P with me on flights and car trips.

I'm curious as to how long others are keeping their machines before getting replacements. :thanks:
Bob. G
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johnomg
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Hi bobg1946,

Just wanted to say: Great Question!

I'm on my first machine, when I asked the supplier how long it would last they were very evasive, the only concrete thing they told me is that the F&P Icon Auto comes with a 3 year Warranty, so I'm hoping it keeps going that long at least, only time will tell.

It will be very interesting to see the responses you get to your question.

Cheers
John
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JudgeMental
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7 years into CPAP and I am on my second one, HOWEVER, thats because a general concinus by industry and USA Medicare dictates that a replacement take place every 5 years. i replaced a good working Respironics with a newer updated Respironics.

Most CPAPs, I expect, will last a lot longer then 5 years if not abused or accidently killed.
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archangle
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JudgeMental
Sep 23 2011, 09:59 AM
7 years into CPAP and I am on my second one, HOWEVER, thats because a general concinus by industry and USA Medicare dictates that a replacement take place every 5 years. i replaced a good working Respironics with a newer updated Respironics.

Most CPAPs, I expect, will last a lot longer then 5 years if not abused or accidently killed.
My legacy REMstar bought in 2004 was used every night until 2009 when I inherited a better machine. It still works fine, but it may be a little noisier than it was when new.

Many of the more modern CPAP machines are booby trapped to make them fail automatically after a certain number of years. They have a battery that keeps the clock working (and maybe remembers the settings.) The battery is not replaceable by the customer, and, at least on Respironics machines, there is no way for the patient to reset the clock even if you do manage to replace the battery.

I don't know what the machines do when the battery fails. For sure, you'll lose the data gathering capabilities. I don't know if the machine will forget its pressure setting or if it will refuse to work and give you an error message.
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TheDuke
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TheDuke
I have used XPAP for about 23 years now. My first machine was a basic CPAP Healthdyne was still working fine after 10 0r 11 years use. When my doctor switched me to a BiLevel Sullivan (Now ResMed) it died after about 6 years, and I am now on a Respironics BiPAP that is a bit over 5 years service and working fine. I suspect that as more gadgetry is added to machines the lifetime will shorten, since there are more things to fail.

I notice that one person posted that Medicare dictates replacement after 5 years, I believe that the actual situation is that Medicare won't replace a machine unless it has been in service for at least 5 years, but it certainly doesn't require replacement. And my own experience was that Medicare required a new sleep test when my latest machine was prescribed.

TheDuke
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PaulaO
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I didn't get a new sleep test. I was called by the DME and told I was eligible for a new machine if I wanted one (mine was about 6 yrs old). I told them of the noises it had been making. My doc had to write a script (my GP, not sleep doc) specifying humidifier (wish I'd known to specify data collection!) and a few weeks later, I had a new machine.

Because of the way my old one had been handled (it actually was considered a 6 yr rental!!!), I had to give it back.

I also wish they had insisted on a sleep test. That way I wouldn't have to argue with them paying for one.
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JudgeMental
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TheDuke.. You are correct in your statement about Medicare not replacing a machine unless its been in service for 5 years. My statement was poorly worded. My DME sent me a notice that my CPAP was over 5 years old and that I "might" be eligible for a free replacement. They req'd me to go to my sleep Doctor for a new RX. He wrote a new RX but said that I did not require a new sleep study. Got the new machine from DME, courtesy of Medicare.

He wrote the RX for a straight CPAP.. DME gave me a auto ... A win for me.
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zonk
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I don,t have insurance and been using my machine for nearly a year and hopefully it can last for many more years before replacement is due .
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Steven
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My first machine lasted just 2 weeks shy of 5 years.
My current machine will be 8 years old at the end of December 2011.

Most insurances will NOT replace a machine that is not at least 5 years old. But, just because it is over 5 years old does not automatically mean they will replace it unless it is not operating properly.

I know that DMEs tell people that they are eligible for a machine when it gets to be 5 years old.
Mine did also.
But, when I told him that I knew that my BCBS PPO insurance plan would not replace it because I was not having any problems with it, he actually told me that they would lie to BCBS & say that it was malfunctioning & needed to be replaced. Apparently DMEs do that all of the time. That is IMHO Fraud ! So, be careful.
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dukeorock
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I travel a lot, which is probably why I have NEVER gotten 5 years out of a single machine...the longest I ever got was my last Respironics BiPAP Plus, which lived about 4 years before giving up the ghost. But when I'm on tour, I will set up and tear down the machine daily for as much as two months straight, so I can't imagine that would be good for any machine.
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Steven
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dukeorock
Oct 9 2011, 01:23 PM
But when I'm on tour, I will set up and tear down the machine daily for as much as two months straight, so I can't imagine that would be good for any machine.
So, you are a musician?

Who do you tour with?

How do your "fans" feel about your CPAP?
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zonk
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On average after 5 years CPAP might clocked up over 15000 hours and the newer machines are more comfortable and better for the patients . I would be really cranky if i was paying my insurance all those years to find out that my insurance company don,t follow other insurance companies in 5 years machine replacement :annoyed: .
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danhobbi88
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I'm on my first cpap machine, respironics remstar pro 400, yesterday a high pitch squal started 3 days after my 2 year warranty expired,assuming it is blower motor, only has 3100 hours. Will call responics to see if they can do anything. Any advice?
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HeadGear
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Steven
Oct 6 2011, 06:27 PM
My first machine lasted just 2 weeks shy of 5 years.
My current machine will be 8 years old at the end of December 2011.

Most insurances will NOT replace a machine that is not at least 5 years old. But, just because it is over 5 years old does not automatically mean they will replace it unless it is not operating properly.

I know that DMEs tell people that they are eligible for a machine when it gets to be 5 years old.
Mine did also.
But, when I told him that I knew that my BCBS PPO insurance plan would not replace it because I was not having any problems with it, he actually told me that they would lie to BCBS & say that it was malfunctioning & needed to be replaced. Apparently DMEs do that all of the time. That is IMHO Fraud ! So, be careful.
I have successfully replaced my machines at the 4 year mark, despite policies stated by the insurance company for a 5 year replacement. The last time, the doctor wrote a prescription dictating replacement of my machine based on technological innovation. Makes sense with consumable medical goods to change prescriptions, so why not with durable goods? However, it is likely that insurance would not have been as compliant if my old machine had been used for a considerably lesser period.
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Steven
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HeadGear
Jan 3 2012, 07:01 PM
Steven
Oct 6 2011, 06:27 PM
My first machine lasted just 2 weeks shy of 5 years.
My current machine will be 8 years old at the end of December 2011.

Most insurances will NOT replace a machine that is not at least 5 years old. But, just because it is over 5 years old does not automatically mean they will replace it unless it is not operating properly.

I know that DMEs tell people that they are eligible for a machine when it gets to be 5 years old.
Mine did also.
But, when I told him that I knew that my BCBS PPO insurance plan would not replace it because I was not having any problems with it, he actually told me that they would lie to BCBS & say that it was malfunctioning & needed to be replaced. Apparently DMEs do that all of the time. That is IMHO Fraud ! So, be careful.
I have successfully replaced my machines at the 4 year mark, despite policies stated by the insurance company for a 5 year replacement. The last time, the doctor wrote a prescription dictating replacement of my machine based on technological innovation. Makes sense with consumable medical goods to change prescriptions, so why not with durable goods? However, it is likely that insurance would not have been as compliant if my old machine had been used for a considerably lesser period.
My previous CPAP was 8 years old at the end of December 2011 when I replaced it with the APAP I now have.

The prescription written by the Sleep Doctor also mentioned my need for a more technologically advanced machine.

My 1st CPAP purchased 13 years ago was replaced just shy of 5 years because the round part that protruded (on which you place the hose) was dry rotting & pieces had broken off over a couple of years to the point where the hose would not seal properly. Even then, BCBS "considered" repairing it instead of replacing it. But I finally convinced them that any money they spent on repairing it could be immediately lost if the motor or some other major part went out soon thereafter.

So, I agree with you that the 5 year rule is not set in stone.
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