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Government Support for Apnea condition; Pensions and Health Cards
Topic Started: Apr 26 2011, 07:52 AM (2,682 Views)
Bundi
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..
Does anyone know whether the Australian Government recognises or provides any financial support for people with severe sleep apnea. If it's available, I assume it would be in the form of a Commonwealth Health Card or a Disability Support Pension. Given the chronic nature and serious health implications of sleep apnea, I would have thought it was a good candidate for some government support. If there is no assistance, maybe some lobbying from sufferers is in order. What say you friends?

Bundi
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zonk
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Bundi
Apr 26 2011, 07:52 AM
Does anyone know whether the Australian Government recognises or provides any financial support for people with severe sleep apnea. If it's available, I assume it would be in the form of a Commonwealth Health Card or a Disability Support Pension. Given the chronic nature and serious health implications of sleep apnea, I would have thought it was a good candidate for some government support. If there is no assistance, maybe some lobbying from sufferers is in order. What say you friends?

Bundi
Yes but sleep apnea is not a disability once it get treated .i think if one is receiving some form of welfare benefit than they are issued automatically with a health care card or disability support pension card if on a disability support pension , it is best to check with the local centre link office .
there is a scheme to help with cpap machine for sleep apnea patients but i don,t know the details but you should discuss it with your GP or sleep doctor .


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zonk
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To generate a bit of discussion.....me too would like to know your opinions whether having Sleep Apnea is considered a disability. :thinking-about:
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Ltmedic66
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zonk,

I think that depends on your definition of "disability". Does a diagnosis of sleep apnea mean that a person is disabled and unable to function? I would so no, as long as the person is treated successfully. In fact, I would say that, once properly treated, all effects of sleep apena should go away.

If you are asking if people who are diagnosed with sleep apnea should receice services under any program they are eligible for, whether it be private insurance or government disability services, then I would say, yes, they should be considered under those programs.
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HeadGear
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zonk
Apr 27 2011, 06:27 PM
To generate a bit of discussion.....me too would like to know your opinions whether having Sleep Apnea is considered a disability. :thinking-about:
I suppose the analogy would be any other chronic "controllable" illness or disease. Diabetes comes to mind! That would be in the nature of a mild disability if treated, (unless general health has broken down due to complications.)

I would say, unequivocally, that sleep apnea is usually a mild disability! If access to CPAP were lost, then it could be major and deaadly.

For that matter, paraplegia could be considered a mild disability if the world were set up to accommodate to it. Also, sleep apnea could become a greater disability if sleepiness is not sufficiently controlled by treatment. For example, you could not drive safely by any means, whereas a paraplegic could (with hand controls.)

For what it is worth, I could consider myself disabled because there are a lot of things that have become difficult for me because of sleepiness. Hence, I am glad to be retired! The working world would be quite a strain for me!
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moeschmoe
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Okay let me put it to you this way. I have moderate to severe hearing loss in my left ear and mild-moderate hearing loss in my right ear. I wear hearing aids, but I still have a disability even though I can live a normal life.

With all due sensitivity to those who are struggling with their disability, it's amazing the technology we have to help all of us strive to live a better quality of life. My hope is that as many people as possible will have access to that kind of assistance.
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zonk
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Ltmedic66
Apr 28 2011, 01:56 PM
zonk,

I think that depends on your definition of "disability". Does a diagnosis of sleep apnea mean that a person is disabled and unable to function? I would so no, as long as the person is treated successfully. In fact, I would say that, once properly treated, all effects of sleep apena should go away.

If you are asking if people who are diagnosed with sleep apnea should receice services under any program they are eligible for, whether it be private insurance or government disability services, then I would say, yes, they should be considered under those programs.
I agree .
Here as far as i know the only assistance one get from their private insurance is a lump sum of approx $500 for cpap machine (mind you the government pays 30% contributions to all private medical insurance but that is another off-topic discussion ),you might be interested to know that the sleep study in public hospitals or private clinics is covered by government funded Medicare .
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Ltmedic66
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zonk
Apr 28 2011, 03:14 PM
Ltmedic66
Apr 28 2011, 01:56 PM
zonk,

I think that depends on your definition of "disability". Does a diagnosis of sleep apnea mean that a person is disabled and unable to function? I would so no, as long as the person is treated successfully. In fact, I would say that, once properly treated, all effects of sleep apena should go away.

If you are asking if people who are diagnosed with sleep apnea should receice services under any program they are eligible for, whether it be private insurance or government disability services, then I would say, yes, they should be considered under those programs.
I agree .
Here as far as i know the only assistance one get from their private insurance is a lump sum of approx $500 for cpap machine (mind you the government pays 30% contributions to all private medical insurance but that is another off-topic discussion ),you might be interested to know that the sleep study in public hospitals or private clinics is covered by government funded Medicare .
Interesting information, zonk! As I am sure you can tell from reading the blogs, many people here in the US simply cannot afford a CPAP or a sleep study, or they have to jump through a bunch of hoops with their private insurance or the DME. Interesting to compare the two systems.
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zonk
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HG @ moe
Those are good points but if you are asking for government assistance than prepare to pay much higher taxes as the present system can not be sustained in its present state with aging population , rising medical cost and unemployment as most factories shut shop and took their business elsewhere where it is cheaper ,( i would stop here as it might go off-topic )
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HeadGear
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zonk
Apr 28 2011, 03:41 PM
HG @ moe
Those are good points but if you are asking for government assistance than prepare to pay much higher taxes as the present system can not be sustained in its present state with aging population , rising medical cost and unemployment as most factories shut shop and took their business elsewhere where it is cheaper ,( i would stop here as it might go off-topic )
A major factor in support for a disability (either financial or other good will) may have to with the obvious "visibility." Sleep Anea is completely invisible and will not get much regard from insurance companies - say in the case of disability insurance, least of all any government programs. Any charitable fund raising for Sleep Apnea would surely flop because there is not enough visibility or glamour to the problem. For this reason, there will not be much public pressure on governments. Therefore, I'm sure taxes will not be going up due to any government assistance!
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zonk
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HeadGear
Apr 28 2011, 08:12 PM
zonk
Apr 28 2011, 03:41 PM
HG @ moe
Those are good points but if you are asking for government assistance than prepare to pay much higher taxes as the present system can not be sustained in its present state with aging population , rising medical cost and unemployment as most factories shut shop and took their business elsewhere where it is cheaper ,( i would stop here as it might go off-topic )
A major factor in support for a disability (either financial or other good will) may have to with the obvious "visibility." Sleep Anea is completely invisible and will not get much regard from insurance companies - say in the case of disability insurance, least of all any government programs. Any charitable fund raising for Sleep Apnea would surely flop because there is not enough visibility or glamour to the problem. For this reason, there will not be much public pressure on governments. Therefore, I'm sure taxes will not be going up due to any government assistance!
We have quite generous welfare @ health system what more government assistance you are talking about .
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HeadGear
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zonk
Apr 28 2011, 11:45 PM
We have quite generous welfare @ health system what more government assistance you are talking about .
I suppose I was not referring to the Australian experience. In Canada, no one is going to pay for your CPAP machine and supplies unless you have purchased expensive private insurance (and then there is usually a sizable deductible or annual ceiling.) However, the provincial medical plan (mandatory) will pay for physician services and sleep study - but wait in line for a long time for that! BTW, the cost for machine and mask is not minor - typically it is $2,500 and up!
Edited by HeadGear, Apr 29 2011, 12:21 AM.
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